Laser Vision Correction

Lasik
Lasik has never been more affordable!
Dr. Lee Hofer & Dr. Tom Harvey are eye surgeons who offer a variety of vision correction surgeries, including LASIK.

LASIK or Lasik (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis) is a type of refractive surgery for correcting myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism.

Custom Bladeless Lasik
During the first step of the Custom Bladeless LASIK procedure, a silent computer-guided laser is used to create the corneal flap. In the bladeless technology, the laser accounts for the natural curvature of the cornea, creating a customized flap of uniform thickness.

  • Surgeons have the flexibility to treat a wider variety of patients
  • Eliminates the need for a hand-held microkeratome blade, creating an “all laser” procedure.

The second step of the Custom Bladeless LASIK procedure is performed after the flap is made. With Custom LASIK, a customized treatment plan is created for each individual eye. This treatment plan is designed based on the patient’s individual prescriptions and corneal curvature measurements allowing for a higher quality of vision than traditional LASIK treatments.

Wavefront LASIK Technology
Wavefront LASIK technology measures aberrations in your eyes. A perfect wavefront is completely flat. When light rays enter the eye and pass through the different structures inside, the wavefront surface changes, taking on a shape unique to that eye. These variations are called wavefront errors.
The wavefront technology’s software performs complicated measurements and presents a visual representation of how light is bent by your eye for the surgeon to evaluate. Data from this process is transferred to the laser and used by your surgeon to create a treatment plan for your refractive error including both low and higher-order aberrations. Treating a LASIK laser eye surgery patient with the information taken from the wavefront analyzer can result in greater clarity of vision and fewer complaints of glare or night halos.

To find out if you are a candidate for LASIK, or other vision correction procedures, contact Chippewa Valley Eye Clinic to schedule a consultation.

If you would like to know more about options for LASIK in Wisconsin or more specifically about our surgeons doing LASIK in Eau Claire Please fill out our contact form and our certified LASIK surgeon will be happy to answer any questions.

Cornea Transplant

Endothelial, Anterior Lamellar

(Penetrating Keratoplasty)

A corneal transplant surgery may restore vision in otherwise blind eyes. The most common indication for this procedure is corneal decompensation following cataract surgery. Other common indications include: corneal ulceration, corneal scars, keratoconus, herpes simplex and varicella zoster viral opacifications, Fuchs Endothelial Dystrophy, and congenital abnormalities of the cornea.

The Corneal Transplantation Procedure

A complete preoperative evaluation is required prior to surgery. Every attempt to confirm retinal and optic nerve function is made prior to the procedure, so as to avoid unnecessary surgery.

The majority of adult patients have surgery under local anesthesia. General anesthesia is often required for children, anxious, or uncooperative patients. After the anesthetic is given, the surgeon may sew a ring to the ocular surface to support the eye. The donor cornea is prepared using a punch or corneal trephine to create the corneal button. The corneal button becomes the transplanted cornea. The diseased, or scarred, cornea is then removed using a corneal trephine, creating a recipient site for the transplanted tissue. Finally, the donor cornea is gently sewn into place with ultra-fine sutures (approximately one-third the thickness of human hair).

Corneal transplantation may be combined with other procedures, particularly cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation.

Post-surgery
Patients should expect a very gradual recovery of vision. In fact, the best vision may not be obtained for six to 12 months or more following surgery. Vision may, however, be improved immediately after surgery. The surgeon will occasionally remove some sutures from the cornea within a few months after surgery. In general, sutures are removed to help alleviate astigmatism once the cornea shows signs of being securely healed into place.

Cornea Transplant

Endothelial, Anterior Lamellar

(Penetrating Keratoplasty)

A corneal transplant surgery may restore vision in otherwise blind eyes. The most common indication for this procedure is corneal decompensation following cataract surgery. Other common indications include: corneal ulceration, corneal scars, keratoconus, herpes simplex and varicella zoster viral opacifications, Fuchs Endothelial Dystrophy, and congenital abnormalities of the cornea.

The Corneal Transplantation Procedure

A complete preoperative evaluation is required prior to surgery. Every attempt to confirm retinal and optic nerve function is made prior to the procedure, so as to avoid unnecessary surgery.

The majority of adult patients have surgery under local anesthesia. General anesthesia is often required for children, anxious, or uncooperative patients. After the anesthetic is given, the surgeon may sew a ring to the ocular surface to support the eye. The donor cornea is prepared using a punch or corneal trephine to create the corneal button. The corneal button becomes the transplanted cornea. The diseased, or scarred, cornea is then removed using a corneal trephine, creating a recipient site for the transplanted tissue. Finally, the donor cornea is gently sewn into place with ultra-fine sutures (approximately one-third the thickness of human hair).

Corneal transplantation may be combined with other procedures, particularly cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation.

Post-surgery
Patients should expect a very gradual recovery of vision. In fact, the best vision may not be obtained for six to 12 months or more following surgery. Vision may, however, be improved immediately after surgery. The surgeon will occasionally remove some sutures from the cornea within a few months after surgery. In general, sutures are removed to help alleviate astigmatism once the cornea shows signs of being securely healed into place.

Schedule your appointment.

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Locations

eau claire 715.834.8471

menomonie 715.235.8335

rice lake 715.234.8444

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